Consultation Hub

Your Opinions Count! Stockport Clinical Commissioning Group would like to know your views and your health need so that we can continually improve local health services. We believe that local people should be at the heart of decision making.

The purpose of this site is to let patients, carers, staff and members of the public submit their views for consideration when we take important decisions. Below you will find information on upcoming consultations, surveys and events; read what people said about past decisions; and see how we used those views to change our services.

Alternatively, you can contact us directly to give us your views on any aspect of our work.

Please note that this site is for understanding local views. For privacy reasons, please do not submit any health-related questions on this site. If you have a question about your health, please contact your GP Practice or local Pharmacy for support.

Featured: Stockport Together: Stockport Citizens

Stockport Together is the name given to the activity being carried out in partnership... More

Closed 1 year ago

Open Consultations
Mental Health Advisory Group
Process for implementing updated NICE guidance.
Gifts and Hospitality Declaratlion 2018 -19
Over the Counter Medicines
See All Open Consultations
Closed Consultations
Team around the Town meetings
End of Life Conversation
Mental Health Training Sessions with TPA
Tea with the GP
Citizens Representation Panel 11th December 2018
See All Closed Consultations

We Asked, You Said, We Did

Here are some of the issues we have consulted on and their outcomes. See all outcomes

We Asked

As Neighbourhood Clinical Commissioner, Steve Bradshaw has indicated an interest and wish to be involved in the development of social prescribing networks. 

You Said

TPA Community Connectors arrange periodic 'Team around the Place' meetings.  These offer the opportunity for local groups/residents to meet and share their values along with what their group can offer as a means of promoting greater local knowledge.

We Did

An example of a positive outcome was that at the Marple meeting it was noticed that there was a clash of meeting times between two groups both of whom would have benefited the same group of attendees.  Therefore one group agreed to change their meeting times.

The overall outcome of all meetings is a better local  knowledge between groups of what is already available and potential gaps.  This will hopefully also then lead to ongoing cooperation and signposting between groups.

We Asked

Overall aim of the engagement

The aim of the engagement was to learn from experiences of family carers what works well, what needs improvement, what is missing and what suggestions people might have to improve our local palliative care offer.

What we were asking

  • What support did you use and how useful was it for you & person you cared for?
          Prompt: support can be professionals, services, information such as leaflets etc.
  • What did you find challenging / gave you extra stress?
    Prompt: can be transport, I.T, lack of information, communication ect
  • What did you miss / what didn’t work well / what can we do better?
  • Were your needs assessed / what are your needs at the moment and what support do you receive / need?

 

You Said

What participants said

Strengths:

  • End of life team at home
  • End of Life assessment
  • Enhanced care team highly valued but only in last 2 weeks of life
  • Advanced care planning works especially well for dementia patients but not necessarily for other conditions

Weaknesses

  • Not a person-centred care plan, no choice provided
  • Not possible to book respite care
  • Variable support from GPs: some very supportive GPs and some carers reported not having received much support from their GP
  • Lack of conversations to discuss and plan end of life care
  • No bereavement support offered
  • Lack of training for staff; staff don’t know when / how to start conversations and what services are available
  • Treatment for pain was lacking

Challenges

  • Adapting home gave stress and had an impact financially; home environment felt less homely
  • Need to start conversations earlier
  • Skills of family carers not appreciated by care home staff when cared for moves into care home
  • Support for deaf people in end phase of life was lacking

Barriers

  • Disjointed services
  • Lack of training for family carers

We Did

What we did or will do as a result (ie how this will influence decision-making)

The feedback from the participants confirmed that the new model needs to have:

  • A single contact point for patients and family
  • More opportunities for respite for the carer
  • Right balance between peer support for carers based on condition and more generic; to create more opportunities to meet others in a similar situation for carers looking after someone with a less common condition
  • Clearer signposting on bereavement support offer
  • Continuity in contact with carers by services in days after person passed away to avoid abrupt ending of support on day person passed away

Based on the feedback we have now

  • Made a split between the palliative care and bereavement pathway to acknowledge the different needs
  • reviewed respite opportunities and are looking in creating more options for respite
  • looked at continuity in support for carers in first days after death
  • improved joint working between elements of the pathway
  • extended enhanced support team involvement
  • looked at training opportunities to upskills staff e.g. home care staff

We Asked

Colleagues were asked about challenges they faced day to day when dealing with clients.

You Said

TPA colleagues asked for training on a list of commonly encountered difficulties relating to clients mental health

We Did

To help improve competencies of non health staff in managing distressed patients within a social prescribing setting, a series of training sessions covering the list was developed and delivered in a small group interactive setting.